Picking a Business That Is Profitable

What Makes a Business Profitable?

If you are wondering what makes a business profitable then you will want to continue reading further. Here are some tips on ways to pick a great business idea. The key is to look at what you are good at doing, then you will be able to stay motivated through the planning process.

For example make a list of the things you have always wanted to try, then look for a good marketing method for reaching your target audience. It may take a few months to reach the ideas business idea but once you are sure where you want to start then you can always expand on it at a later date.

In this article I will discuss some of the easiest ways to make money with your business and this especially works for those who are operating in a small work environment or they have a 1 to 2 person work staff.

It is hard to build up momentum when you are a small business but at the same time you can use this to your advantage. Big corporations have the high cost of overhead and this can make it difficult for them to reach a local customer base and that is where you come in.

A company is an association or collection of individuals, whether natural persons, legal persons, or a mixture of both. Company members share a common purpose and unite in order to focus their various talents and organize their collectively available skills or resources to achieve specific, declared goals. Companies take various forms such as:

Voluntary associations which may include nonprofit organization
A group of soldiers
Business entities with an aim of gaining a profit

Financial entities and banks

 A company or association of persons can be created at law as legal person so that the company in itself can accept Limited liability for civil responsibility and taxation incurred as members perform (or fail) to discharge their duty within the publicly declared “birth certificate” or published policy.

Because companies are legal persons, they also may associate and register themselves as companies – often known as a corporate group. When the company closes it may need a “death certificate” to avoid further legal obligations. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Company)

 


Business can refer to a particular organization or, more generally, to an entire market sector, e.g. “the music business”. Compound forms such as agribusiness represent subsets of the word’s broader meaning, which encompasses all activity by suppliers of goods and services. The goal is for sales to be more than expenditures resulting in a profit.

There are a variety of legal types of organisations, including corporations, governments, non-governmental organizations, international organizations, armed forces, charities,not-for-profit corporations, partnerships, cooperatives, universities, and various types of political organizations. A hybrid organization is a body that operates in both the public sector and the private sector simultaneously, fulfilling public duties and developing commercial market activities.

A voluntary association is an organization consisting of volunteers. Such organizations may be able to operate without legal formalities, depending on jurisdiction, including informal clubs. Organizations may also operate in secret and/or illegally in the case of secret societies, criminal organizations and resistance movements.
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organization)

 

Business Definition

A business, also known as an enterprise or a firm, is an organization involved in the trade of goods, services, or both to consumers.

Businesses are prevalent in capitalist economies, where most of them are privately owned and provide goods and services to customers in exchange for other goods, services, or money. Businesses may also be not-for-profit or state-owned. A business owned by multiple individuals may be referred to as a company.

 

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business)

Forms of business ownership vary by jurisdiction, but several common forms exist:

Sole proprietorship: A sole proprietorship, also known as a sole trader, is owned by one person and operates for their benefit. The owner may operate the business alone or with other people. A sole proprietor has unlimited liability for all obligations incurred by the business, whether from operating costs or judgements against the business.

All assets of the business belong to a sole proprietor, including, for example, computer infrastructure, any inventory, manufacturing equipment and/or retail fixtures, as well as any real property owned by the business.

Partnership: A partnership is a business owned by two or more people. In most forms of partnerships, each partner has unlimited liability for the debts incurred by the business. The three most prevalent types of for-profit partnerships are general partnerships, limited partnerships, and limited liability partnerships.

Corporation: The owners of a corporation have limited liability and the business has a separate legal personality from its owners. Corporations can be either government-owned or privately owned. They can organize either for profit or as not-for-profit organizations.

Image pixabay

 A privately owned, for-profit corporation is owned by its shareholders, who elect a board of directors to direct the corporation and hire its managerial staff. A privately owned, for-profit corporation can be either privately held by a small group of individuals, or publicly held, with publicly traded shares listed on a stock exchange.

Cooperative: Often referred to as a “co-op”, a cooperative is a limited liability business that can organize for-profit or not-for-profit. A cooperative differs from a corporation in that it has members, not shareholders, and they share decision-making authority. Cooperatives are typically classified as either consumer cooperatives or worker cooperatives. Cooperatives are fundamental to the ideology of economic democracy. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nonprofit_organization)
More interesting articles that you may find interesting.
The Startup Owner’s Manual guides you, step-by-step, as you put the Customer Development process to work. This method was created by renowned Silicon Valley startup expert Steve Blank, acknowledged catalyst of the “Lean Startup” movement, and tested and refined by him for more than a decade. Business Model Generation is a handbook for visionaries, game changers, and challengers striving to defy outmoded business models and design tomorrow’s enterprises.

If your organization needs to adapt to harsh new realities, but you don’t yet have a strategy that will get you out in front of your competitors, you need Business Model Generation.Eric Ries defines a startup as an organization dedicated to creating something new under conditions of extreme uncertainty.

This is just as true for one person in a garage or a group of seasoned professionals in a Fortune 500 boardroom. What they have in common is a mission to penetrate that fog of uncertainty to discover a successful path to a sustainable business.

Value Proposition Design helps you tackle a core challenge of every Business and Moneybusiness creating compelling products and services customers want to buy. This practical book, paired with its online companion, will teach you the processes and tools you need to succeed.

 Using the same stunning visual format as the authors’ global bestseller, Business Model Generation, this sequel explains how to use the “Value Proposition Canvas” a practical tool to design, test, create, and manage products and services customers actually want.

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