Tragic but True: Your Chair is Your Best Friend

That’s the truth we need to live with

The title probably looks like an exaggeration of the modern urban life that is by and large based on non-stop office work because we are not ready to accept that the chair is more dear to us than family and friends. Indeed, I am not trying to suggest that you should love your office chair or care about more than you care about people. What I intend to do is draw your attention to the fact that we are spending the bulk of our life sitting on that chair and we need to pay it the due attention.
As a matter of fact, we are spending more time sitting on the chair than we spend in the bed or with our family. Forbes reports that a 40-hour work week in the United States actually lasts 47 hours with approximately 20 percent of Americans actually working more than 60 hours a week. And what about those who are self-employed, who work from home or work in a way that more work means more money with no upper limit? Imagine a web developer who will not hesitate to keep writing code because he wants to earn more. Imagine a stocks investor who wants to be in front of the computer when London stocks exchange opens. Our ambition to make money knocks over any limits on the time we spend on the chair.


That’s the truth we need to live with

The title probably looks like an exaggeration of the modern urban life that is by and large based on non-stop office work because we are not ready to accept that the chair is more dear to us than family and friends. Indeed, I am not trying to suggest that you should love your office chair or care about more than you care about people. What I intend to do is draw your attention to the fact that we are spending the bulk of our life sitting on that chair and we need to pay it the due attention.
As a matter of fact, we are spending more time sitting on the chair than we spend in the bed or with our family. Forbes reports that a 40-hour work week in the United States actually lasts 47 hours with approximately 20 percent of Americans actually working more than 60 hours a week. And what about those who are self-employed, who work from home or work in a way that more work means more money with no upper limit? Imagine a web developer who will not hesitate to keep writing code because he wants to earn more. Imagine a stocks investor who wants to be in front of the computer when London stocks exchange opens. Our ambition to make money knocks over any limits on the time we spend on the chair.


So What Should We Do About It?

Perhaps, it is a good idea to cut the time we spend on our quest to make more and more money. Of course, sitting less in the chair would cause us to earn fewer dollars but are we not already spending the money on thing that we do not really need, or worse, things that we do not have time to enjoy. For instance, we buy new cars and homes although we are fine with the old ones. We buy TV sets we do not have time to watch, kitchen appliances we never use. By cutting down the unnecessary spending we would have to earn less and work less. In essence, we would have more time to live with people instead of the chair.
Needless to say, the chair is going to retain its place as one of the key pieces of furniture in our lives, certainly much more important than some of the trophy appliances that decorate the interior of our home. The quality of your chair decides how efficiently you use your precious time and your overall health in the long term. Unlike many other things, a good ergonomic chair actually is worth the money spent purchasing it. This is something you might want to keep in mind next time you shop for one.


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